Menu
My burn-out
My burn-out

PROQOL: PROFESSIONAL QUALITY OF LIFE SCREENING

When you [help] people you have direct contact with their lives. As you may have found, your compassion for those you [help] can affect you in positive and negative ways. Below are some questions about your experiences, both positive and negative, as a [helper]. Consider each of the following questions about you and your current work situation. Select the number that honestly reflects how frequently you experienced these things in the last 30 days. You may replace the bracketed term [help] with one that is more suitable for your group. If you are working with teachers, for example, you may want to replace helper with teacher and help with teach. For nurses, replace the word helper with nurse and help with nurse. For attorneys, replace the word helper with attorney and help with represent and so forth.

I am happy.
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I am preoccupied with more than one person I [help].
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I get satisfaction from being able to [help] people.
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I feel connected to others.
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I jump or am startled by unexpected sounds.
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I feel invigorated after working with those I [help].
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I find it difficult to separate my personal life from my life as a [helper].
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I am not as productive at work because I am losing sleep over traumatic experiences of a person I [help].
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I think that I might have been affected by the traumatic stress of those I [help].
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I feel trapped by my job as a [helper].
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

Because of my [helping], I have felt "on edge" about various things.
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I like my work as a [helper].
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I feel depressed because of the traumatic experiences of the people I [help].
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I feel as though I am experiencing the trauma of someone I have [helped].
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I have beliefs that sustain me.
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I am pleased with how I am able to keep up with [helping] techniques and protocols.
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I am the person I always wanted to be.
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

My work makes me feel satisfied.
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I feel worn out because of my work as a [helper].
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I have happy thoughts and feelings about those I [help] and how I could help them.
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I feel overwhelmed because my case [work] load seems endless.
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I believe I can make a difference through my work.
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I avoid certain activities or situations because they remind me of frightening experiences of the people I [help].
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I am proud of what I can do to [help].
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

As a result of my [helping], I have intrusive, frightening thoughts.
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I feel "bogged down" by the system.
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I have thoughts that I am a "success" as a [helper].
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I can't recall important parts of my work with trauma victims.
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I am a very caring person.
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

I am happy that I chose to do this work.
Never
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Very Often

Correct!

Wrong!

Share the quiz to show your results !

Subscribe to see your results

PROQOL: professional quality of life screening

%%personality%%.

%%description%%

%%personality%%

%%description%%

This is the most positive result. This result represents a person who receives positive reinforcement from their work. They carry no significant concerns about being “bogged down” or inability to be efficacious in their work—either as an individual or within their organization. They do not suffer any noteworthy fears resulting from their work. These persons may benefit from engagement, opportunities for continuing education, and other opportunities to grow in their position. They are likely good influences on their colleagues and their organization.

People who score high on burnout, in any combination with the other scales, are at risk as individuals and may also put their organizations in high-risk situations. Burnout is a feeling of inefficacy. In the work setting, this may be a result of personal or organizational factors. The prototype burnout is associated with high workloads and poor system function. A person may feel as if there is “nothing they can do” to make things better. It is likely they are disengaged from their patients, even though this is not associated with any fear as a result of engagement with their patients. People suffering from burnout often benefit from taking time off. They may also benefit from changing their routine within the organization

People who make these scores are typically overwhelmed by a negative experience at work as characterized by fear. If this fear is related to an event that happened to the person directly, such as having their life endangered as a result of participating in a dangerous rescue, or if they experienced a traumatic event such as sexual violence by a colleague, these are not secondary experiences. These are direct exposures to dangerous events. However, if the person’s fear is related to taking care of others who were directly in harm’s way, this is secondary traumatic stress. These people are likely to benefit from immediate treatment for traumatic stress and, when present, depression. Because they are neutral in regard to their feelings of inefficacy at work, or feelings of pleasure associated with their work, consider focusing on the fear-related work experiences

This combination is typically unique to high-risk situations such as working in areas of war and civil violence. People who score in this range are often highly effective at their work because they feel their work matters. However, they have a private self that is extremely fearful because of their engagement with others. Some fear is accurate and appropriate in high-risk situation. However, high secondary traumatic stress is marked by thoughts, feelings, and memories of others’ traumatic experiences mixed with their own experiences. This can be particularly difficult to understand when the experiences of those to whom the person provides help are similar to his or her own. Knowing that others have been traumatized by the same type of situations in which the person finds him or herself has the potential to change the person’s interpretation of the event. People with scores like this typically benefit from encouragement to build on their feelings of altruism and thoughts that they are contributing to the greater good. Simultaneously, their fears and fear-related symptoms should be addressed. Depression is theoretically unlikely given their high feelings of satisfaction.

This combination is seemingly the most distressing. Not only does the person feel overwhelmed and useless in the work setting, they are literally frightened by it. People with this combination of scores are probably helped most by being removed from their current work setting. Assessment for PTSD and depression is important. Treatment for either or both may have positive outcomes, but a return to an unmodified work situation is unlikely to be fruitful.

Your profile is out from standard cases defined in the ProQOL method, You may consult a therapist to investiguate.

Do you have questions ?


Have a 15 minuts free chat with a specialist.


Loading...